Archive for wolfbrigade

Review: Crutches

Posted in Reviews with tags , , , , , , on June 29, 2012 by Magadh

Crutches Demo 2012 self-released

I’ve never actually been to Sweden, but I’ve got to think it’s a pretty interesting place. For starters, they must have more anarcho-crust bands per capita than any place on the planet. Little did I know when I procured my first Crude S.S. 7”, back in the long forgotten days of the early 1980s, that it would be the start of such a fruitful relationship.

One problem that arises out of this for aspiring Swedish thrashers is that if you’re going to mine this vein now you’ve either got to be a bit ignorant or a bit arrogant. If it’s the former, it’s a matter of not recognizing that you will be judged against every band from Asocial to Wolfbrigade, with about a thousand points of reference in between. If it’s the latter, it’s a matter of knowing this and not caring, which is also a viable strategy. It’s often said that rock and roll should be played as if one had just discovered it five minutes ago, and this holds a fortiori for Scandinavian d-beat bands. This particular furrow has been so extensively plowed that the hope of finding some new twist within the format must be vain.

With that granted, I still believe that it is a thing worth doing. This is a powerful mode of expression; one that combines dissonance and dissidence, so to speak. It is a mode of counterhegemonic art and identity formation that still provides the opportunity to create a self outside the norm, and to forge connections with others similarly inclined to form identities outside of society’s norms.

It is from such a perspective that I had the pleasure of discovering the recent demo from Sweden’s Crutches. This is some angry, aggressive d-beat hardcore in the tradition of Anti-Cimex, Avskum, Diskonto, yeah, you get the idea. The recording quality is quite good, with guitars rendered in that razors through flesh sort of sharpness that the bands of the early waves of d-beat could only dream of. The most common failing of bands like this is to dwell to long on song structures that are too simple. Crutches avoid this pitfall, concocting short, angry blasts that leave the listener wanting more, rather than wondering when the song is going to end. You have to love a band that manages five repetitions of the f word in the first ten seconds of their first cut. They also get added points for most evil rendering of a squid in their logo.

They’ve released this demo via bandcamp and on their website. Head over there and get it. Yes, you! Do it now.

Magadh

Scanning the Scene in the City Tonight: Shirts and Destroy

Posted in Dispatches with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 25, 2012 by Magadh

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1000 Trivialities is firmly committed to DIY culture. We send infernal hails to those who defy homogenization of culture and resist psychic death. It is in that spirit we introduce you to  the fine people at Shirts and Destroy.

Shirts and Destroy is an international art and music collective. A menagerie of tattoo artists  (Thomas Hooper, Chris Conn, King Avenue to name a few), bands (All Pigs Must Die, Nachmystium and Wolfbrigade among others), artists (David Cook, Arik Roper and Florian Bertmer and friends) and other misfits all contribute to keep the collective viable.

In their own words:

“Shirts & Destroy is an ever expanding and evolving team of artists, designers, tattooers, musicians, screen printers, giclee printers, illustrators and other creative minded contributors. We produce, publish, manufacture and offer to our customers fine art and high quality boutique style music merchandise.

Our mission is to support true underground artists and musicians before their ideas are inevitably co-opted, copied and watered down to be sold in shopping malls.

Contributors of Shirts & Destroy invest no money and recoup 80% of the profits from sales after production costs. Our customers directly support the artists and musicians on our roster and we work hand in hand to ensure the artistic integrity of our contributors endeavours is always intact.”

Check them out online here or, if you find yourself in Brooklyn, pop into their new bricks and mortor shop at  293 Manhattan ave Brooklyn, NY.

The world will forever owe them a debt of gratitude for (via their imprint label Nonbeliever) releasing the All Pigs Must Die Ep.

We Heart D-beat!

Posted in Dispatches with tags , , , , , , , on June 1, 2012 by Magadh

If there is one thing the 1000 Trivialities bunker holds self evident it is the unassailable truth that d-beat is unfuckwithable. In that spirit, we’d like to share a few of our favorite bands with you.

Discharge “Hear Nothing See Nothing Say Nothing”

Wolfbrigade “Hostile Wasteland”

Disfear “Misanthropic Generation (live)”

Skitsystem “No Hope, No Future, No Second Chance”

Tragedy Full set live at Tampere, Finland 5.13.11

– Captain of Games

Review: Wolfbrigade

Posted in Reviews with tags , , , on May 22, 2012 by Magadh

Wolfbrigade Damned Southern Lord

The guys at Southern Lord have really been making a play for world domination lately. If you stick with this blog you’ll find that the Captain and I have a real fascination with their catalog. When we heard that the new disc from Swedish d-beat veterans Wolfbrigade was coming out on Southern Lord we were, needless to say, breathless with expectation. I am happy to report that it does not disappoint.

First a little history. In 1986, I was living just outside of Nottingham in the U.K. Notts was a great place to be if you were a punk rocker kid in those days. I was hanging out at the Salutation in Nottingham when word went around that Anti-Cimex were coming over from Sweden to do a couple of shows. We were all pretty stoked. I traveled the hour or so to Birmingham with the Concrete Sox guys, who had sort of taken me under their wing. We met up with Anti-Cimex and Agoni, another Swedish band, before their show at a pub called the Mermaid (as I recall, Heresy played that night as well).

It was under these circumstances that I met Jonsson, the singer for Anti-Cimex and, incidentally, one of the persistently drunkest people I have ever encountered. About ten minutes after I met him, Sean from Concrete Sox and myself had the pleasure of trying to keep him from beating the shit out of some guy (who kind of deserved it, to be fair) with a bullet belt. At the show in Nottingham a few days later, Jonsson, who was totally rat-assed (and from what I could tell had been so constantly in the intervening period) planted himself beside the front door to the gig. Whenever anyone would go in, he would wave a picture of himself in their face and say very earnestly, “Me.” Of course, being totally lit had no discernible adverse effects, either on Jonsson’s performance or on those of his bandmates. Anti-Cimex played two blistering sets while being absolutely pickled in lager.

The presence of Jonsson was a big selling point for me of the early Wolfpack discs. As in Anti-Cimex, his vocals were gruff, but you could understand what he was saying, which for me was a plus. Those early Wolfpack releases, especially A New Dawn Fades and Lycanthro Punk, were a real step forward for the d-beat style. As Anti-Cimex had begun to do on Country of Sweden, Wolfpack differentiated themselves from the d-beat pack by adding a melodic element to their approach which made their simple, straightforward song structures noticeably more effective. Bands like Crude SS and Asocial were great, but a little melody mixed gave the style in general a bit more punch and variety.

Wolfbrigade, the band that Wolfpack became have had mixed results in terms of quality since they parted ways with Jonssen in 1998. Progression/Regression, released in 2001, set the tone for a lot that came later. The songs were good, but lacked the cutting edge of their earlier material. Their new release, the first since Comalies four years ago, marks a triumphant return to form for the band. Throughout their existence, Wolfbrigade have consistently delivered bludgeoning punk rock. On Damned, the quality of song writing once again rises to the level of those early releases. The melody is more in evidence that it has been for the last several releases, and it is accompanied by production that is slicker, but crucially thicker than their recent offerings. They also seem to have branched out a bit stylistically. There are moments when this disc sounds like Motorhead. At other times, one can discern something that sounds like black metal, especially on “From Beyond,” which contains a passage that sounds a lot like Dissection’s “Where Dead Angels Lie.” All of this is very much to the good. The crucial thing about this record is that the level of aggression has been upped along with the melodic content, perhaps not to the level of Disfear, but enough to ensure that this disc will be getting plenty of spins here in the bunker.

Magadh