Archive for death metal

Review: Power Trip

Posted in Reviews with tags , , , , , , , on April 13, 2017 by Magadh

Power Trip, Nightmare Logic, Southern Lord

power trip2There are a number of things that differentiate this disc from Power Trip’s previous outing (2013’s Manifest Decimation), but the one that you’re really going to notice if you’ve heard the earlier release is the production. Manifest Decimation was a good record in a lot of respects, an example of the mid-80s style thrashmetal that occasionally lifts its head above the sea of black metal and grindcore. It has some pretty good songwriting and a decent degree of aggression. The main problem was that the recording seemed so awash in something (reverb probably) that it made the songs hard to discern.

I’ve got no problem with raw recording values in metal and hardcore. Sometimes, given the right overall tone, it can add an element of atmosphere (I won’t tax you by reciting where I think this is the case but if you page back some of my reviews you will find ample evidence). But in the case of Manifest Decimation, it just made it difficult to follow the chord changes without really adding the needed atmospheric dimension.

I am happy to report that this problem has been sorted in their new disc. Nightmare Logic is crisply recorded and features a wealth of punch, intense thrash metal cuts. Those who heard their split with Integrity from last year will have seen the moves in this direction, but the release of Nightmare Logic shows that they can put it together for a whole album’s worth of material, which is worthy of note. And let’s be clear: this album absolutely rips. They don’t have quite the tonality of a band like Havok, but they are none the worse for being a bit nastier.

power trip1As you might expect given the four year gap between their full releases, there are other improvements to be noted. Power Trip have made notable advances in terms of songwriting and arranging. Their sound is reminiscent (at least to my ear) the thrashmetal bands that labels like Combat seemed to release with such frequency back in 1980s, particularly Dark Angel, with whom they share more than a passing similarity. That said, their songs are more complex and intensively developed than Dark Angel were in their heyday.

That said, their songs are more complex and intensively developed than Dark Angel were in their heyday. Power Trip’s songs are full of little back picked elements that add power in ways that are hard to quantify or to describe in the abstract. I found myself thinking of the picking style of Artillery’s first couple of records. The drums are clearer as well, and I really loved the snare sound, thick and thudding, but with enough tone to cut through and be heard.

Nightmare Logic is one of the best exemplars of the thrashmetal genre to be released in at least the last five years. It’s got a lot of variety and changes of speed, and the musicianship is about as close to flawless you’re ever going to hear. I have to admit that I wasn’t expecting a great deal to begin with, these guys have produced some really hard rocking stuff that’s going to be infesting my stereo (and tormenting my neighbors) for a long time to come.

Review: Cruz

Posted in Reviews with tags , , , , , on March 31, 2017 by Magadh

Cruz, Culto Abismal, Sentient Ruin Laboratories

cruz1The dregs of this shit week were enlivened by the receipt of this awesome disk. What we have here is eight helpings of extremely tasty death metal riffage. It’s mostly middling in tempo (right about the speed and gruffness of Corpse’s classic “Black Dawn) and I have to say I like that. Blast beats are cool and all, and they really seemed like something novel to me when I heard Napalm Death do them in the 1980s, but they’re really not my favorite part of death metal.

These Barcelona thrashers have a pretty good formula: crushing, straightforward death metal with galloping beats and utterly tortured vocals. There are a lot of bands to which they might be compared. They sort of remind me of a kind of grimier sounding version of Entombed, although they generally don’t get up to the speeds that Swedes moved at. But that’s just fine. Cruz have an idea of what they want to do and the execute their plan with panache and aggression.

cruz2This disc has been on repeat in my car for the best part of a week now, and every time I listen to it I pick up some nuance or vibe that I hadn’t caught before. The thing that differentiates them from a lot of bands that don’t roll at super high speeds is that their riffs are complex and compelling. They’re not content to just chug along on damped bar chords. Not to harp on the Entombed thing, but their riffs sort of put me in mind of a more aggressive version of Clandestine.

The sound of this record is absolutely perfect: dark and dismal, but clear enough to let the music shine through. Culto Abismal was recorded and mixed by Javi Félez (bassist in Graveyard who are only marginally less awesome). It was mastered by none other than Brad Boatright, who pretty much turns everything he touches into dark, thrashy gold, and this is no exception. Boatright brings a certain bleak aesthetic to everything he does, and Culto Abismal is a perfect example of this. It is a dark, swirling mass of sound rolling forward with the momentum of a freight train.

Yeah, just to sum up, this is the best thing I’ve heard since the last Martyrdöd album came out, and but for the awesomeness of that record it would be the best release that I heard from 2016. So if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to crank this up again and keep on rocking until the apocalypse descends.

Review: Our Place of Worship is Silence

Posted in Reviews with tags , , on March 28, 2017 by Magadh

Our Place of Worship is Silence, The Embodiment of Hate, Broken Limbs Recordings

 

opwis1This came out in October of last year and I really meant to review it then. But at that point I was so drowned in real world foolishness that it slipped away. But I guess that’s how it always seems to work. I’m seldom right up on the cutting edge of events.

 

The first thing that needs to be said about this record is that it nearly caused me to wreck my car on the highway. This was not due to its overwhelming quality, but rather to the peculiarity of its recording values. I have a car stereo that’s old enough to where I can’t like my phone to it wirelessly and have to depend on a hardline connection. Quite often the first sign that the jack is breaking is that only one of the stereo tracks will play. As I made the turn onto I-90, I must admit that I was rather distracted at the thought that this was happening and my efforts to jiggle the cable back to life I nearly ran off the road.

 

opowis2The fact of the matter is that this record sounds like it was recorded in a sewer pipe by a crew of bigfoots (bigfeet?) who stumbled on to someone’s gear all set up and decided to bang out some death metal. Strange as it may sound to say it, this actually works. There are lots of records that one could point to in which the the deficiencies of the recording actually end up adding, in some only partially expressable way, to the quality of the output. One example might be Sacrilege’s Behind the Altars of Madness, where the imprecision of the recording process gives the music a dark, swirling quality that makes up for any lack of clarity is made up for richly in terms of the atmosphere it creates.

 

The Embodiment of Hate has a grubby, discontinuous quality which holds the interest quite nicely. I’ve read other reviewers compare this early Nihilist demos, but to me it sounds like Nominon, especially in their demo phase (which can be heard here, here, and here). In any case, the comparisons are more about tone and texture than the actual music itself. The music is guttural, the tuning low, I mean really low. I could probably hear this music better if I was an elephant or perhaps some species of gray whale, but the parts that I can hear I like.

opowis3I suppose that my only real beef with this record is that off all the changes in level amongst the various instruments I find that the guitars are never quite as loud as I’d like them. Of course, I’m a guitarist, so caveat very much emptor. I feel like I can hear different things more prominently at different times. The effect of this is to give each cut an individuality that their collective grunginess and simplicity might not intrinsically convey.

 

In all seriousness, this is a pretty ripping slab of death metal. The riffs are dark and unrelenting, and the vocalist sounds like he’s spent the last six months gargling masonry nails. They’ve found a way to write simple, straighforward metal songs that keep you interested. It doesn’t sound clean or clear, but it sounds right and that is, in fact, a lot more important.